Smart politicians should tackle youth issues to win election 2013

The peak voice for youth affairs in Australia has urged all political parties to place youth issues at the forefront of their campaigns if they want to win the upcoming federal election, with young voters playing a pivotal role in deciding who runs the country.

Reynato Reodica, Acting Executive Director of the Australian Youth Affairs Coalition (AYAC) said, “Last month, Kevin Rudd urged young voters to come back, listen afresh and re-engage with politics. So this election, we’re asking our leaders to make sure young Australians have a reason to do so, by demonstrating to young people that their voices have been heard as they head to the ballot box on September 7.”

The peak voice for youth affairs in Australia has urged all political parties to place youth issues at the forefront of their campaigns if they want to win the upcoming federal election, with young voters playing a pivotal role in deciding who runs the country.

Reynato Reodica, Acting Executive Director of the Australian Youth Affairs Coalition (AYAC) said, “Last month, Kevin Rudd urged young voters to come back, listen afresh and re-engage with politics. So this election, we’re asking our leaders to make sure young Australians have a reason to do so, by demonstrating to young people that their voices have been heard as they head to the ballot box on September 7.”

Young voters account for roughly 30% of all Australian electors. Research shows that young Australians have had a substantial, if not decisive, influence on who has been our Prime Minister after each of the past 4 federal elections.

Mr Reodica said, “By addressing the issues that are important to young people – such as youth unemployment, housing affordability and marriage equality – candidates and leaders can help re-engage young people in the political system”.

“Over 1.4 million young Australians could be eligible to vote this election. With the two major parties so close in the polls, the number of young Australians enrolled and who they choose to vote for could determine who forms the next government of Australia.

“This means there’s a real incentive for leaders to listen to young Australians and speak sincerely about the issues young people care about.”

For Further Media Comment:
Reynato Reodica, Acting Executive Director, Australian Youth Affairs Coalition  | M: 0416 929 252

Additional information:

• The Australian Youth Affairs Coalition (AYAC) is the national voice for young people and the youth affairs sector. AYAC’s vision is for an Australia in which young people are informed, empowered, encouraged and supported to participate in their communities –www.ayac.org.au

• *The Whitlam Insitute Study, “Youth Federal Election Voting Intentions: A Statistical and Graphical Analysis of Newspoll Quarterly Data 1996-2010” can be found here http://www.whitlam.org/publications/young_people_and_democracy